Sores in Nose that Won’t Heal Causes & What to Do

I have suffered from sores inside my nose before. I guess you have too. What actually causes these sores inside nose? In this discussion, we will look into some of the questions that you might be having about sores inside your noses including: Why do I get sores in my nose or why do I have sores in my nose? How do you heal sores in nose that won’t heal? What are some of the most effective sore nose tips? Enjoy the reading.

What Causes Sores in Your Nose

Sores in Nose that Won’t Heal – Causes & What to Do 2

Causes & What to Do

Sores in your nose, or nasal sores if you like, are pretty unattractive and may make you feel uncomfortable. Redness and inflammation of the nasal lining is often associated with sores in the nose. Sores inside the nose are also typically painful.

Nasal herpes is one of the common causes of nose sores. It is caused by Herpes simplex Virus, or HSV, and is characterized by blisters and sores inside and around the nose.

A sore in nose (or any other part of the body such as the mouth for that matter) caused by nasal herpes is very likely to recur since the virus usually remains in the body even after the sore has cleared, occasionally manifesting itself in the form of a new sore.

While nasal herpes cannot be cured since it is caused by a virus, your doctor will prescribe medication to manage the sore breakouts and make them shorter.

Pemphigus foliaceus can also cause sores in your nose. This is an autoimmune skin disorder that results in blisters on the skin and mucous membranes.

In some cases, trauma on the nose is the cause for nose sores. This can for example happen due to blowing the nose too hard or when sneezing whereby the blood capillaries in the nasal lining rupture leading to small ulcers.

Bacterial infection can also cause nasal sores. The nasal passages act as a shield for the body against external particles such as dust and bacteria in the air we breathe. Such elements are trapped in the mucus trapped in the nose hairs but in case of cracks inside the nose, the bacteria may cause infections in the nasal lining leading to nose sores.

Staphylococcus bacteria are the most common culprit for nasal sores. Sometimes referred to as staph, these bacteria are commonly found on the skin in most people and can get transferred to the nose when someone picks their nose with dirt hands.

In fact at least 50 percent of the people have staph bacteria in their mucous lining although they don’t really notice them since they are typically harmless. They can however cause infections in certain cases such as when the fingernails cause small cuts and hair follicles breakage in the nasal lining as someone picks their nose.

When that happens, the bacteria in the fingers and/or the mucus lining penetrate the nasal lining resulting in an infection which can be manifested in a nose sore.

Nasal sores tend to appear more in winter months due to the dryness associated with them. During this time, scabs tend to form in the nose and the desire to pick them results in damage to the mucus membranes and bleeding. Ulcers may at times form inside the nose, particularly in the nasal septum area.

Another likely cause of sores inside the nose is allergy to chemical fumes, nose piercing, and nasal sprays. This typical manifests itself in itching, redness and irritation inside the nose.

Common cold, nasal polyps and lupus are other causes of sores inside your nose.

Sore Nose from Blowing

Sores in Nose that Won’t Heal – Causes & What to Do

Sores in Nose that Won’t Heal – Causes & What to Do

While blowing your nose helps you to get rid of excess mucus form the nostrils, continuous wiping and blowing such as when one suffering from cold or flu can make your nose become red and inflamed.

Blowing the nose too frequently makes the delicate skin inside and around the nose to turn and get inflamed.

This tends to affect most people during the cold weather especially in winter when low temperatures coupled with dryness in the atmosphere create a perfect environment for colds and nose sores.

Wiping and blowing the nose too hard can also cause the blood vessels inside the nose to rupture and bleed, eventually leading to formation of nose sores. Sometimes, scabs may form as the nose tries to heal itself and if someone can’s avoid the temptation to pick at the nose, the nasal lining may become inflamed, resulting in a sore nose.

It is advisable to use gentle towels and handkerchiefs for nose blowing as rough ones can cause nasal irritation. You should also avoid blowing your nose too hard and instead do it gently, ideally starting with one nostril before moving on to the next.

Use a saline nasal spray, gel or drip can also help to decrease the frequency of nose blowing. This not only helps to remove excess mucus but also gets rid of allergens and pathogens in your nose. Antihistamines can also help to decrease the frequency of drainage. Sore nose can also get relieved by applying a little amount of Vaseline petroleum jelly on the inside your nose. A hydrocortisone cream can also be applied in the event of severely sore nose.

Painful Sores inside Nose or Painful Nose Sores

Painful sores inside your nose can be an indication of bacterial infection or nasal herpes. Staph infection is perhaps the most common culprit for most sores in the nose. This often results when staphylococcus bacteria found on the skin or trapped in the mucus membrane cause a nasal infection.

Nasal herpes is on the other hand a contagious infection caused by Herpes virus. One can get infected due to contact with an infected person e.g. through kissing, or from sharing utensils such as cups.

Bridge of Nose Sores

If your bridge of the nose is sore, this might be a sign of sinusitis (sinus infection). Antibiotics can be prescribed to get rid of sinus infection. Sore Nose Bridge can also be the result of a trauma such as when a football discovers that your nose bridge is tough enough to challenge its flight path.

What Do To a Sore in Nose That Won’t Heal

Sores inside the nose disappear on their own in most cases. But what about nose sores that keeps recurring? What causes nasal sores that just won’t heal?

Persistent nasal sores can be due to a nose picking habit by the person experiencing them. Constantly picking on the nose sores delays the healing process. Leaving the sores alone may make them heal, but if that also doesn’t help, you should consider seeking the attention of a medical professional.

Sores in Nose that Won’t Heal – Causes & What to Do - Oral Herpers

Oral herpers could be the cause

Sores that won’t heal may indicate nasal herpes, a viral infection caused by Herpes Simplex Virus. When someone gets infected with herpes virus, resulting in nose sores, the sores may disappear on their own after a week or so, but since the virus doesn’t go away, recurrent infections manifesting in sores in the nose may occur from time to time. Factors such as stress, fever and trauma may trigger recurrent nasal herpes infections.

Treatment of herpes typically involves prescription for anti-viral drugs and other medications that may ease the symptoms.

A sore inside the nose that won’t heal can also be a sign of superficial staph infection inside the nose. This is often caused by staphylococcus bacteria that end up in the nose from dirty fingernails while picking the nose.

Staphylococcus bacteria are also commonly found in the nose of most people, trapped in the mucus membranes but in case of cuts and scratches on the nasal lining, they might cause an infection.  If irritation results, further picking only ends up in further irritation and so on.

Applying a bacitracin ointment can help but if that doesn’t help, you should consider seeing a doctor.

Sore in Nose Tips

Sore nose tips most often result from bacteria infection. For example, folliculitis, bacterial infection of the nasal hair follicles is a common cause. This often happens in people who are into the habit of pulling their nose hairs.  It can also result due to frequent wiping of the nose, resulting in irritation. Antibiotics usually help to relieve sore nose tip. In case of allergies, antihistamines may also be prescribed.

Suggested Further Reading:

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